Jeff Holchin
I messed up my knees yesterday on the farm; my left knee is OK now but not my right one; hoping it is “just” bursitis and will stay off my feets for several days. Several years ago I woke up in the middle of the night with terrible stomach pain and had to be rushed to the hospital for emergency appendectomy surgery.

Got me to thinking about dealing with such medical problems while hunting far from the road and how I would handle it: has any PBSer suffered similar or worse injuries in the field and how did you deal with it?823DF346-1A7C-4C3D-9E17-98D4E9FCC744.jpeg  84597037-25E2-4B4D-9807-BAF3833A4D22.jpeg
This is what happens when you surprise your menopausal wife with news about your next hunting trip and she happens to be a former kick boxing champ of NC....
Quote
Randy Brookshier
Dang Jeff...  that right knee looks bad.  Hopefully you're gonna have it looked at.

I've been doing this for enough decades, and seen myself or my friends get fairly seriously hurt often enough to know that it is a real possibility.  That's why I always have my red EMT bag that rides in my truck.  If you remember, I fell in that talus slope in Utah several years ago and tore a 5" gash in my shin with a big hunk of meat and skin hanging.  I washed it out, filled it with betadine and then super glued it back together.  Hurt like the dickens but I hunted and hiked for another week.  Left a cool looking scar!
Quote
John Scheels
Jeff: 
I emphatically agree with Randy. Have a doc check it out, today.  That edema may not just be due to trauma to the knee joint.   That broken skin in the farm environment is a portal for a bacterial infection.  I developed a staph infection from a compound fracture of my tibia.  Became a six month ordeal.
Don't wait, have it checked out.
John
John
Quote
Jeff Holchin
I hate going to the doctor but I might go to the urgent care in town today for a look-see.  

Randy, that’s a good idea!  I remember seeing that injury and thinking “uh oh”.  Something about that Blacks Fork area - I remember one bowhunter choking on a steak there during an evening meal and having to be “heimlicked” to dislodge it and another one stabbing himself while sharpening his knife in camp; he refused our help and drive himself to the ER for stitches at midnight!
This is what happens when you surprise your menopausal wife with news about your next hunting trip and she happens to be a former kick boxing champ of NC....
Quote
Joe Lasch
I've been fortunate not to need it, but I have downloaded a Kindle book "Wilderness Medicine" from the National Outdoors Leadership School.  That, a good first aid kit, and an Inreach device are my emergency plans.
Get that knee checked out Jeff!
Quote
Ethan
Holy cow man!!  Hope that turns out ok for you!!  
Quote
Tim Denial
Jeff
  Get those knees checked out. For if you end up with knee problems. Your hunting will suffer. I'm telling it like it is.
Quote
Rob Burnham
Listen to your brothers of the bow Jeff, go have that knee looked at.  Like Randy I keep a first aid bag in the truck and carry some supplies any time I back pack in.  PPPPPP= Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance.  
Quote
Tim Denial
Jeff 
Regarding dealing with injuries in the back country,I must say I have always taken a minor first aid kit with me.
What I have tried to do in the past was take provisions with me that would make an unexpected stay in the back country more bearable.
Ex. Space blanket,water purifier,extra shirt,fire start and such. (got caught short on water on my elk hunt this past year) 
I have done a fair amount of hiking in the Adirondaks most being day hikes of 4/5 hrs and as long as 16 hrs.
While talking with mountain top host and ranger personal. A large percentage of hikers go into day hikes ill prepared.
One host told me that rescue people tend to have a lot more sympathy for the hiker that maybe broke an ankle and while waiting for help had the space blanket,extra jacket and such.VS the sneaker/flip-flop hiker with a small bottle of water and tank top. I once gave a wool shirt to a family on top of a summit in the white Mtns. of NH. They were ill prepared for the weather turned to icy rain and they had a child with a tee shirt. I kinda went off on them and told them to descend pronto. Thankfully they did and left my shirt on my truck.
Quote
Terry Receveur
You just can't unsee things. Jeff, I feel bad for your knee, but I feel worse for me having seen your legs (good and bad). They are hideous.
Quote
JulianT
Feeling bad for you while laughing at Terry....

Reminds me....PBS in St Aug or Cincy our ER docs, Tom and Steve did a great backcountry medicine seminar.  Wish our new videographer, Chris Miller, would have been there to record and upload it.

Seriously, though, have that checked out asap.
Quote
Walter Francis

Jeff,

Have your knee checked, a few pills or shots can prevent a whole lot of issues that might affect a moose hunt.

Regarding your question.  Most important thing you can take is what’s between your ears.  Adapt and make use of what you have with you.  Most everything with you carry in the woods has multiple functions, with a little ingenuity they have a lot more. 

 On my Alaska hunts I take a small first aid kit I got from the medic on Brother Bob’s Special Forces team almost 40 years ago.  It is small, less then half the size of my I-pad, but it has everything I need, or am capable of using.  It has a suture kit, typical medicines I have added and rotate like Excedrin, Alieve, Neosporin type antibiotics, Tums, and any needed prescriptions.  My doctor gives me a prescription for pain killers and antibiotics in case me or my hunting partner should need them (haven’t had to use them).  If you are squeamish and don’t like sewing yourself up, they make super glue that will work instead of sutures, if you are careful with the wound.  I took a backcountry first aid class about 15 years back, don’t remember much from it but take the small field book from the class with me.  If needed, it can be used for reference, or to start a fire, or even toilet paper (Couldn’t help poking a little fun at the current TP shortage in some places).  

I have used the suture kit several times to remove flys and stitch up a couple of minor cuts in other people.  While in college I once used dental floss, a sewing needle bent and sterilized at the stove, a pair of needle nose pliers, and Listerine ( for sterilization), to put in 13 stitches and close a big gash in my leg.  Before anybody asks, yes, alcohol was involved.

Again, what’s in ones head, knowing when and how to use it, are the most important thing to take.

Walt Francis

The broadhead used, regardless of how sharp, is nowhere as important as being able to place it in the correct spot.
Quote
David Balowski
You just can't unsee things. Jeff, I feel bad for your knee, but I feel worse for me having seen your legs (good and bad). They are hideous.
LOL   I agree with Terry.  Jeff I hope you made it to a Dr yesterday 
Quote
Jeff Holchin
Terry, I saw you checking out my legs when we roomed together in Springfield.....before you went 🤮

Had my knees examined today.  Left one is fine and the right one is less painful, less swollen and more flexible.  No broken bone, cartilage or tendons, but lots of bruising.  I am continuing the ice, elevation, ibuprofen and rest.  So in my best Monty Python voice, I declare “it’s just a flesh wound”...🤓
F23D3F0F-B796-4BCD-AB5D-B4A263224B88.jpeg 
This is what happens when you surprise your menopausal wife with news about your next hunting trip and she happens to be a former kick boxing champ of NC....
Quote
Terry Receveur
Please, for the love of your fellow man, stop posting pictures of your legs!  Excuse me while I go puke.

Ha ha! Seriously, good news it isn't something debilitating in the long run.
Quote